Your Current State
Mid-Atlantic

Check out our newsletter

Additional thanks to the Nebraska Soybean Board, Indiana Soybean Alliance, Minnesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council and South Dakota Soybean Research and Promotion Council for their support of Mid-Atlantic Farmers Feed US


Mid-Atlantic Farmers
Feed US

Mid-Atlantic Soybean Farmer

Jay Baxter

“My grandfather passed the heritage on to his two sons and was a steward of the land and of the air and of the water. My father passed this on to me and I also want to pass this heritage down to my children.”

Jay Baxter
Soybean Farmer

Name: Jay Baxter
Location: Georgetown, Delaware
Years farming: I’ve been farming full-time since graduating from the University of Delaware in 2002, where I earned a bachelor’s in science for agriculture. Like most farmers, I’ve been working on the farm since I could walk.
My family: My wife Jessica and I have two boys, ages three and 15 months. We also work with my grandfather, “James Jr.,” who goes by “Jim,” and my grandmother, Ruth.
How I came to be a farmer: I never knew anything different and never wanted to be anything different. All of the children in the family had the opportunity to do this or do other things, and I was the one who always wanted to do it. I always shadowed my father and grandfather on the farm since I was very young.
The best thing about being a farmer: Being outdoors and watching miracles of life every day and to be able to raise my children with a good work ethic.
My personal philosophy on farming: I have a plaque that my sister gave me that reads, “Opportunity is missed by most, because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” It actually hangs over our bed. My philosophy is to do the best I can do with the crops I produce today and make sure that the land, water and air are clean and healthy for tomorrow’s generation of farmers.

Soybean Production in Delaware and the United States
  • Delaware farmers planted approximately 180,000 acres of soybeans in 2011, up 5,000 acres from 2010.
  • Virtually all Delaware soybeans are processed to separate soybean meal and oil, with the meal being used as poultry feed.
  • During the winter, many Delaware farmers plant "cover crops," which help prevent soil erosion and protect the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays by using up any excess nutrients in the fields.
  • The USDA considers approximately 42 percent of Delaware farmland.
  • Sussex County, Delaware, which consists of the southern third of the state, leads the state in agricultural sales with more than three quarters of the state's output.



For more information about soybean farming in Delaware, visit the Delaware Soybean Board.

Meet Another Farmer

MA Soybean Baxter tour 2 copy.jpg MAFarmersFeedUSSoy1_0051.20111006_0051.jpg MA Soybean Baxter tour 1 copy.jpg